On the Border

Lionel Rogosin’s 1957 documentary “On the Bowery” is one of those richly liminal works that exist between the old (the Flaherty school of the composed, fictionalized, restaged documentary) and the new (the soon-to-explode cinema verite movement, driven by the availability of new, more portable cameras and sound equipment). Shot in 35-millimeter, and presented on [...]

Jerry after Dean

Thanks to Olive Films, three missing titles in the Jerry Lewis filmography have been filled in, all transitional works in one way or another. From 1958 come “Rock-a-Bye Baby” and “The Geisha Boy,” both directed and co-written by Frank Tashlin and the first features to be fully conceived for Jerry without Dean. The VistaVision [...]

Blame It on Rio

MGM has released three of the four Hitchcock/Selznick films on Blu-ray (“The Paradine Case,” of course, remains the neglected stepchild), which gives me an excuse to return to “Notorious” for this week’s New York Times review. Yep, it’s still a pretty good movie, perhaps the most complexly structured of Hitchcock’s forties films and the [...]

Strauss, Schoenberg and Straubs

The Warner Archive Collection has issued a handsomely remastered version of “The Great Waltz,” a fanciful 1938 MGM biography of the Viennese composer Johann Strauss mostly directed by the French filmmaker Julien Duvivier on a pre-war visit to Hollywood. While Duvivier was in Hollywood, directing an international cast that included the Belgian music hall [...]